Fashionista Fundraiser for Endometriosis Awareness

Endometriosis of America

When I was in my early twenties, I had an older girlfriend who suffered from Endometriosis. She often had horrendously painful periods and would go into hiding those times of the month. But since she also had a flair for the dramatic, we all were pretty dismissive of her disease and brushed it off.

Ten years later, I left what I thought was a regular gynecological visit and checkup with a fertility specialist, with a diagnosis of Endometriosis myself and a recommended surgery to remove cysts on one of my ovaries.

For a woman who had a regular, yet often very painful 28 day cycle, this news came as a shock to me. In retrospect only had I realized that all those painful periods weren’t “normal” and that pain is one thing but accompanied with all the other symptoms I had, was not.

Many women with Endometriosis don’t have any symptoms, but I’m not one of those “lucky” ones. Maybe I have a flair for the dramatic too? But with random stabbing upward pain in my lower abdomen, leg soreness and excruciating back aches, pain during sex, and major pain during bowel movements {sorry TMI}, being dramatic is the very last of my intentions. Sometimes I can only liken the bowel pain to contractions while giving birth… sometimes the pain is so intense I worry I’m going to pass out from it. I just want the pain to subside. I just want to crawl back in bed and sleep it away. It keeps me from doing things and as hard as I try to schedule my life around my period, it always seems to show up in time for an important event. I am also completely exhausted during this time, probably from all the pain, but it also doesn’t happen with every cycle. I’ve tried to keep track of the habits and as soon as I think it’s every 3rd cycle, it happens on the 2nd or the 4th.

“Lucky” for me and other sufferers, there is no cure. There is also little known medication to help except contraception, tricking your body into thinking it’s pregnant and actual pregnancy. Otherwise, there are pain meds… which I am not fond of taking, but have to on occasion. What’s also really “fun” about Endometriosis is that it often leads to fertility issues, and infertility, which I also have been facing since 2007. {read my infertility story}

That was an unbelievably momentous time in my life, being diagnosed with Endo, Cysts, having surgery then facing the monthly disappointment of another failed attempt at having a baby. I’m not going to lie, I have a difficult time accepting this diagnosis and fate even now, 5 years later. I often feel like a failure and like my body has let me down. I wish I was one of those who didn’t want children because this would be an easy lie I could tell people when they ask.

176 million women & girls worldwide suffer from Endometriosis

If you think you may have Endometriosis or can help someone diagnose their symptoms, you can read more about Endometriosis here to find out and make an appointment with a fertility specialist rather than your regular gynecologist to make sure.

Endometriosis Foundation of America founders: Padma Lakshmi and Susan Sarandon with Bridget Moynahan

Endometriosis Foundation of America founders: Padma Lakshmi and Susan Sarandon with Bridget Moynahan. original photo via EFA, altered photo via the Asian Cajuns

Endometriosis Foundation of America strives to increase disease recognition, provide advocacy, facilitate expert surgical training, and fund landmark endometriosis research. Engaged in a robust campaign to inform both the medical community and the public, the EFA places particular emphasis on the critical importance of early diagnosis and effective intervention while simultaneously providing education to the next generation of medical professionals and their patients.

Go to Endometriosis Foundation of America to find out more.


If you’d like to help spread the word or donate to help us fund Endometriosis research, you can Donate via Paypal safely and securely by clicking this link.

All proceeds for this fundraiser will go directly to the Endometriosis Foundation of America.

Thank you Diane at Snapshot Fashion for organizing this fundraising event and Lauren at Asian Cajuns for helping spread the word with your story as well.

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Profile photo of Maegan Tintari

LA native & lifestyle blogger Maegan Tintari writes daily at ...love Maegan.com sharing beauty & style secrets, including fashion DIYs, how-to nail art manicures, hair tutorials, recipes & home decorating ideas, as well as a look into her personal life, her journey & battle with infertility & recent relocation to the mountains by a lake in search of a better life with her adorable French Bulldog brothers, Trevor and Randy.

17 Comments

  • Diane

    September 25, 2012 | Reply

    thanks so much for your help with this fundraiser! i appreciate it so very much!!!

  • Daisy Nguyen

    September 25, 2012 | Reply

    Thanks for the info! My friend suffers from endometriosis, and the emotional stress and strain of how this has affected her is sad. She is having a hard time conceiving too, and she would make a great mom!
    XOXO
    -Daisy Nguyen from PS BANANAS fashion blog:
    http://psbananas.com

  • Hannah

    September 25, 2012 | Reply

    What a cool drive! My mom had severe endometriosis and ended up having a hysterectomy a few years back, while I was still in high school. It was pretty emotional for our whole family.. thanks for featuring this fundraiser!

  • Anonymous

    September 25, 2012 | Reply

    I’m 38 and I was diagnose at 15 years old with endometriosis. I have no children and at this point my only options is adopting since I do not have a partner, husband or boyfriend. I have to make up my mind soon, I have to do it alone and I find help in your blog. Adoption is a very difficult process in my country and could take 5 or more years. So I need to make a plan soon. Thanks for sharing, has been helpful to me.

  • Laurie

    September 25, 2012 | Reply

    Maegan,
    Thanks so much for always being so open and honest. I love your blog because you don’t BS anything. You always tell everyone exactly how it is and I love you for it. I read several blogs as my morning coffee/wake-up routine, but yours is always the first. It’s refreshing, like having my coffee with a girlfriend. You don’t hide behind your DIYs and your gorgeous clothes (which I am oh so envious of) :)… you share your life with your readers. Thanks for being real.

  • Dina Karivalis

    September 25, 2012 | Reply

    Great info and it is so nice of you to participate.
    xo Dina

    http://www.sweetestsomethings.com

  • ashley

    September 25, 2012 | Reply

    Thank you so much for sharing this! I have suffered with this painful illness my entire life. Like you, I thought all of the pain and unpleasant side effects were normal. After experimenting with way too many medications and hormone replacements, I was eventually (& unfortunately) also diagnosed with cervical cancer. Even more medications and surgeries later, I finally have some relief. Although, the possibility of children in my future looks slim. It has certainly been a very long battle for me and I’m sure it’s not over yet! However, it feels SO good to know that others are experiencing similar things and that awareness is being raised.

  • hotpants™

    September 25, 2012 | Reply

    I got diagnosed at the age of 16. From my very first period, I had horrible horrible horrible symptoms. It’s been a long, hard road, but after two kids I’m finally mostly symptom free. I expect it to start creeping back up on me though. And then, I’m going to tell them to yank everything out. I’m so over it.

  • Anonymous

    September 26, 2012 | Reply

    Thanks for helping raise awareness. I hate endo. Every month has to be planned around the pain and heavy bleeding. I wish there were better options for treatment and maybe someday there will be! I found that tampons were getting really painful to wear because of all the endo tenderness and I’ve found the diva cup to be way gentler on my body when I need as little discomfort as possible.

  • Anonymous

    September 26, 2012 | Reply

    I am sorry you suffer Endo, i am 22 years and i had my first surgery at 18 years and later at 21. i have been suffering from a long Long time since i was 10 years old. Endometriosis is exhausting phisically and mentally, i have been all my life with this and believe me i know how horrible is it. I am planning to get married and i really put all my trust in God and i hope i can get pregnant.

    Excuse my english and

    Strong, Hope and kisses to all my endosisters!!!

  • Jess

    September 26, 2012 | Reply

    What a wonderful cause! I just had a surgery in April to remove my Endo because I too was having issues with conceiving. I also do fertility treatments, I take 5 days of femara starting on my 3rd cycle day, then I get an internal scan to see if I have produced any follicles, if so, I start doing ovulation predictors on day 9, if I don’t get a positive on my own once my follicle growth is at about a 20 (determined by int. scan) my husband gives me an HCG shot which will trigger the ovulation process, I then decide whether I want to do an IUI ($$$) or just have planned intercourse. Then I start taking progesterone (for 10 days) a week after my positive ovulation (this strenghthens the uterus to help implantation).I just did another IUI and will get a blood test on Monday to see if it worked and I’m pregnant. I do this every month! I’m posting this because I find it interesting to read other people’s infertility treatment methods and I’m sure you have many infertility readers like myself. Thanks again for bringing attention to the Endo cause! Love your blog!

  • LesliMarie

    September 26, 2012 | Reply

    Thank you so much for sharing this. Unfortunately I share your pain because I too suffer from Endometriosis Stage IV. Its also the cause of my infertility for the past 4 years. I can only hope more people will raise awareness, for all of us that have to live with this disease.

    http://www.LesliMarie.com

  • :: Lavender's Green ::

    September 27, 2012 | Reply

    Thank you so much for sharing this Maegan. I was diagnosed with endometriosis when I was 12 and have since had three surgeries to remove it and been on numerous medications (including steroids when I was 12, which caused all sorts of problems).

    I had no idea that there was a foundation for it! I wonder if there’s one in Australia too?

    x Jasmine

  • drollgirl

    September 27, 2012 | Reply

    i have had lots of female trouble lately. not sure if i have this, but they are checking me for all sorts of “fun” things next week. ugh. UGH. it seems like our reproductive organs are so fucking vulnerable to problems. i am sure all of the shit in our food, water and environment don’t help matters!!! ugh!!!

  • Anonymous

    December 4, 2012 | Reply

    My midwife has this, she told me that using a “cup” (like a Divacup or Mooncup) instead of tampons and pads, reduced her pain during her period by leaps and bounds. I never been diagnosed with endometriosis, but have always had very painful pms and periods. Using a cup made a BIG difference in my pain levels and also Red Raspberry Leaf tea (on a regular basis and extra during my “time) had helped me immensely.

  • Anonymous

    December 10, 2012 | Reply

    Well I suffer from the opposite, lots of pregnancy syndrome.
    I know a lot of women that want kids. Yes they are cute, but ideally it would be awesome if you could just rent them on occasion.
    Kids are incredibly insane. You are so beautiful that you have no idea how fast the lack of sleep drains the beauty right out of you. 6 years and 4 kids. I am just getting a piece of me back. I feel like I aged 20 years over the time. Oh and your boobs…so sad they just turn into floobz.
    Anytime you want to spend a week seeing if the grass is greener….DH and I would love to take that trip to the Bahamas…:)
    Yes they are beautiful and full of life and love, but they are insane and angry and loud and demanding. Like scream at you until they are blue in the face because you didn’t slice the apple fast enough or dared to share it with a sibling. Oh and the messes the never ending mess, always cleaning and picking up. And they pee all over the place even when they are 8 they miss the toilet and hit the seat 50% of the time. Yesterday my 2 year old tried to stab her brother with a fork at a restaurant because she thought he was going to take her money! My kids are not un normal they are the norm. Kids are all cute on paper and on TV but they are a full time no pay thankless job.
    They can bewitch you with their magical smiles and terrify you with their tiny anger. So enjoy what you have or don’t have and don”t forget to rent before you buy!

  • Amy

    April 9, 2013 | Reply

    Thank you so much for raising awareness of endometriosis. I think most women just expect that periods should be painful and don’t realize that they actually have a disease. I’ve had numerous surgeries to remove cysts and “clean out” the endometriosis and my doctor told me my best option was to adopt. My insides apparently weren’t looking very inviting. I am one of the lucky few with the disease that got pregnant using Clomid while doing testing for IVF. I had a great pregnancy and thought that I would be lucky and it would cure the endometriosis. Not so much. When my period returned, it was worse and then became constant. The endometriosis was in the walls of my uterus so I bled constantly. We were happy being a one child family so I had a hysterectomy at the age of 38. I am one of rare women that STILL have a period without a uterus because I made the decision to keep my cervix. The endometriosis is apparently in the walls of my cervix as well. It’s not nearly as bad as it was before so I’ll just wait for menopause when my doctor PROMISES I will really be done with my period. haha. Good luck to you! I just recently came across your blog and am really enjoying the variety of topics you cover. Hopefully soon, one of the topics will be your pregnancy.

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